Next DLC meeting will be March 16. Interlaken Townhall, 100 Grasmere Ave at 7PM

The DLC was chartered in 1974 by the 7 shore line towns. Our mission is to provide leadership, guidance, and resources to preserve and restore Deal Lake and its tributaries as a healthy and stable ecosystem. In addition, control lake levels during heavy storms to the best of our ability with limited ocean tide controls.

    Master Plan

     

     

    Deal Lake Master Plan – 2018

     

    A Plan of Action for Deal Lake, Monmouth County, NJ

     

    Prepared by the Deal Lake Commission

    (Living Draft – started in 2012 as of 8/17/18

     

    Deal Lake Commission    

     Attn: Jessie Joseph
    399 Monmouth Rd,
    Oakhurst, NJ 07755

     

    Meetings at:

    Interlaken Town Hall
    100 Grasmere Ave
    Interlaken, NJ 07712   

     

    Jessie Joseph – Commission Clerk  

     

    www.DealLake.org

     

    Commission Members for 2012:

     

    Allenhurst Borough – Bruce Fromer, Treasurer

    City of Asbury Park – Susan Henderson

    Borough of Deal – Jim Rogers,   Vice Chairman

    Interlaken – Rick Guibord

    Neptune Township – Jason Jones

    Ocean Township –   John Everson

    Village of Loch Arbour – Erin Dolan

     

    Commission Members for 2018:

    Don BrockelOcean, Chairman
    Don Nissim, Interlaken, Vice-Chairman
    Jeannie Toher, Asbury Park
    Bruce FromerAllenhurst, Treasurer
    Erin DolanLoch Arbour, Secretary
    Eric HoughtalingNeptune, Assistant Treasurer
    Vacant, Deal

    Staff
    Commission Clerk – Jessie Joseph 
    Environmental Consultant – Dr. Stephen Souza, Princeton Hydro, LLC.
    Engineer – Peter Avakian, Leon S. Avakian, Inc.
    Attorney – Hunt Parry, Esq.
    Web Master – Jason Taetsch

    CFO:  Lorraine Carafa

    The Deal Lake Commission:

     

    The DLC was chartered in 1974 by the 7 shore line towns. Our mission is to provide leadership, guidance, and resources to preserve and restore Deal Lake and its tributaries as a healthy and stable ecosystem. In addition, control lake levels during heavy storms to the best of our ability with limited ocean tide controls.

    Lake Size: About 158 acres 

    Watershed size : 4400 Acres

    Elevation: Lower Main Section: 3.2 feet above mean high tide

    Mean Depth: Between 5 and 6 feet

    Shoreline: Over 10 miles

     

    PURPOSE OF MASTER PLAN and a Little History:

     

    This Master plan will discussed the history, layout of the watershed, general solutions to a regional water shed problems, and specific solutions with the five sections (tributaries) that make up The Deal lake 4400 acre watershed.  This plan will be as much instructive and educational as it will be a road map for future projects to restore Deal Lake to conditions found in the 1950s and 1960s. The Deal Lake Watershed Protection Plan Milestone 5 Report Grant #RP04-082, found at the DLC web site, is a more detailed and scientific look at the lake and is basis for this Masterplan.

     

    Five major human caused events contributed to the conditions we see in Deal Lake Today: We’ll discuss solutions in detail further in the plan.   

     

    1. The Damming of the estuary over 150 years ago,
    2. Major Dredging of the lake in the early 1940s (all main sections) & spoils pumped into the ocean.
    3. Building of Sea view square mall in the 1970s with zero storm water retention.
    4. Building of Middle Brook Apartments and Middle Brook Shopping centers in the 1970s with zero storm water retention.
    5. Removal of a Dam’s retaining wall at the end of Wickapecko ave at Roseld ave.  (In the 1970s) 

     

    For decades Federal and State governments along with environmental groups have focused on cleaning the coastal waters of the Atlantic Ocean.  These efforts have significantly improved ocean water quality and given us cleaner beaches.  When we look at current sources of ocean pollution, we realize little attention and money has been given to restore and safe guard our rivers, bays, estuaries, and coastal lakes. Deal Lake is NJ’s largest coastal lake and does affect the water quality of the ocean.  These coastal waterways are now the primary sources of pollution entering the ocean.  Our annual clean-ups help reduce floatables and plastics as well as other remediation actions such as installation of manufactured Treatment Devices, Tree boxes and  other green infrastructure to cut nutrient load down.  We can do better reducing the geese reduction, animal waste, carp population, and find and fix sewer pipe and oil tank leaks.

     

    The Deal Lake depth maps of the Early 1940s show basically the lake as an estuary and depths at that time about what they are now.   In the 1940s the lake had a dramatic dredging (We assume by the state) which brought depths to as deep as 10 feet as old timers can recall.  From that point on it has been being filled with sediment and organic material for well over 80 years.  A few limiting dredging efforts were made in the 60s, 80s and 2004 but with no long lasting results.   The errors of the 1970s still haunt Deal Lake and its’s tributaries.  Sea View mall and Middle brook apartments and shopping centers started a fast decline in the late 70s that could be seen with plumes of sediment heading east.  The watershed lines extends from Bangs ave Asbury on the south side up to the top of Rt 66 just west of Rt 18 and goes north on Green grove road until Deal Road to the ocean.  4400 Acres.  If you have been around since the 70s you know there was not much developed west of RT 35.  The trees and unpaved ground provided a great filter for rain water and the nature springs that feed Deal Lake.  Paving over the land and removal of the trees with no way to hold the water back is the main issue for Deal Lake over the last 50 years.  The good news is developers now must plan for storm water management in their building plans.  

     

    In addition, a dam that was located downstream from Middle brook shopping center was removed decades ago causing major damage to the Allenhurst section of the lake as sea view damaged the Sunset portion. 

    Underground mysteries await us.  Under Seaview mall and at the top of Hollow Brook in Neptune (bangs ave) lie old dumps for Neptune and the surrounding areas. The human impact on the land around Deal Lake has made its mark and we try to right those wrongs.     

     

    This plan will highlight the problems of Deal Lake and offers solutions to improve the lake’s water quality and will minimize flooding due to rising sea levels and increased run off.

    The DLC  goal is to improve overall water quality, minimize flooding, improve the health of the lake, and improve recreational opportunities on the lake. 

     

     

    TOPOGRAPHY,  MAP:  Deal Lake by the Section: 

    Due to a series of dams and geographically isolated sections in the main body, Deal Lake can be divided into twelve distinct ecosystems each with its own set of problems. There are also seven significant streams that feed into the lake.  Focusing on a section at a time will allow us to better fund maintenance and restoration projects and make these efforts more manageable.  Here are the sections and stream tributaries:

     

    Lake Sections and Ponds:

    1. Ocean section – East of Railroad Bridge to Ocean Avenue
    2. Main section – East of Wanamassa Point to Railroad Bridge
    3. Allenhurst section – West of Railroad Bridge to Monmouth Road
    4. Ironwell section – Just West of Allenhurst section and North of Interlaken
    5. Martin’s Branch – South of Interlaken and North of Wanamassa Point
    6. Sunset section – West of Wanamassa Point to Wickapecko Road
    7. Fireman’s Pond – Just West of Wickapecko Road between Grassmere and Raymere Avenues
    8. Lollipop Pond – West of Wickapecko Road and North of Foodtown Liquors
    9. Lollipop Retention Basin – West of Lollipop Pond
    10. Terrace Pond – West of Wickapecko Road and North of Colonial Terrace
    11. Hollow Pond – West of Wickapecko Road and South of Colonial Terrace
    12. Sunset Lake – (Yes it drains into Deal Lake) Sunset and it’s small water shed is part of Deal lake.  Between Sunset and 5th Avenues. 

     

    Significant Streams (From North to South):

    1. Harvey Brook (formerly Hog Swamp Brook) Headwaters at Kepwel Spring in Wayside
    2. Ironwell Creek (just south of Corlies ave and north of Interlaken park)
    3. Un-named Stream (feeds Fireman’s Pond)
    4. Un-named Stream (feeds Lollipop Pond)
    5. Un-named Stream (feeds Terrace Pond via English Manor)
    6. Un-named Stream (feeds Terrace Pond via Seaview Mall) (Headwaters un-named pond on Route 66.)
    7. Hollow Brook (Headwaters in West Bangs Avenue sand hills section in Neptune; runs south of ShopRite  and Shore Lanes bowling lanes)

    DEAL LAKE MAP:  The sections above are shown below:

     

     

     

    LAKE CHARACTERIZATION (Physical Parameter Chart) SPREADSHEET  (see attached 1)

     

     

    An attachment document (Physical Parameter Chart for Deal Lake Master Plan)

     will contain a spreadsheet broken down by lake sections as defined above and will characterize each section by size, shoreline, water depth, etc. and by identifying problems such as: weeds, algae, pollutant levels, fallen trees, approximate amounts of organics and dredge spoils, access, etc.

     

     

     

     

    BACKGROUND

    Deal Lake’s watershed is over 4400 acres in size.  Most of the watershed is developed and comes under the category as being an ‘urban watershed’. 

     

    Currently, storm water enters from over 4000 storm drain inlets located in seven municipalities and travels through a network of pipes emerging via 250 outfalls that deliver this runoff into a tributary or directly into the lake.  Deal Lake was formed when the estuary flow to the ocean was dammed up in the 1890s by the founder of Asbury Park. 

     

    The current Dam structure built in the 1920s was modified over the years is about 3.5 Foot above mean tide.  Deal Lake empties into the Ocean between Asbury Park and Loch Arbour.  The water flows out through a relatively new 5×8 foot flume pipe which empties into the Ocean about ¾ the way out on the north east side of the 8th ave jetty.   The Flume pipe is was rebuilt built in two phases.  Phase 1 was between the Lake to the surge chamber and was completed in 1986.  In the early 2000s beach replenishment south of the 8th ave jetty started to clog the outfall pipe and prevented flow out and fish migration in and out of the lake.  Joe Palatto of the Asbury fishing club was instrumental in obtaining congressional approval for the 2nd phase which extended the flume in 2006 and rebuilt the 8th ave jetty. The new 400 foot Army Corp of Engineer (ACOE) extension project now releases the water towards the northeast side of the jetty and has restored the fish migration. 

     

    The design of the dam (under the flume building built in 1921) allows the water to flow over during most tides but also allows a salt water mixing during high tides which allows fish migration of critical species of Shad, Herring and other fish.  There has never been a method to shut down ocean flow during storms, thus dramatic volumes of Ocean water negate many lowering efforts to minimize flooding.   The DLC has requested grants for that effort but none have been approved yet.  The Flume structure is not a flood control device.

     

    Bolted to the dam are two sluice gates that are raised by a gear system with in the flume building.  The gates actual open from the bottom of the dam and can reduce the lake height by about 2 feet. DEP only allows 1.5 feet to be removed during major storm events.  There are more than 5 major of run off sources that pour the same amount of water into the lake as goes out.  The lake can easily handle a 2-3 inch rain fall in a 24 hour period.   The challenge are 4 inch and greater rain events and a rising sea level and conditions of a north east storm which will not allow water out and in fact pour water into the lake. Homes and Business that have flooded, will flood again.  These locations should ensure they are insured via flood insurance programs and prepare their homes and business for the avent of floods.  The DLC web page, Email system, and tweeter can help with those alerts.    

     

    As is the case with many of New Jersey’s coastal lakes, there have been limited funds to manage runoff from locations that did not have to comply with storm water management technics.  New State Regulations for Storm water management does protect Deal Lake to some extent.  Later in the master plan we’ll talk about actions to correct the past.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    DLC Major Accomplishments 2011-2018:

     

    The DLC has had great success in obtaining funds and installing projects to control Sediment, oils and floatables controls and even had one dredging project:  H ere is the current list of accomplishments:

     

    1. Comstock Ave Manufactured Treatment Device(MTD) : Installed in 2011 319 grant from NJ dep.

     

    1. Colonial Golf Couse improvement project: Installed in 2011 319 grant from NJ dep.

     

    1. Asbury Park boat ramp living sea shore: Installed in 2011 319 grant from NJ dep.

     

    1. Boom installation west of the boat ramp and in colonial Terrace.

     

    1. $1.6 million Super Storm Sandy Dredging project on the east end that removed 35,000 Cubic yards of material.

     

     

    1. Kinsley ave MTD installed sometime in 2000 we believe by AP developers.

     

    1. DEP 319 Grant award in 2017 for installation of another MTD west of boat ramp on the memorial ave and Sunset lake out fall pipe. This will treat a section of storm water that travels over 1 mile south of the Deal lake and almost reaches Asbury park Post office.  The water quality of the is pipe is some of the worst in the water shed.  Implementation 2018-2021.

     

     

    1. DEP 319 Grant award in 2017 includes green infrastructure improvements(tree boxes and Floating wet lands) to Sunset lake which connects to deal lake by the Asbury Park High school fields.  Implementation 2018-2021.   

     

    1. A $550,000 Flume automation and improvement project has been approved and funded by the Army Corp of Engineers(ACOE) through a DLC partnership with the NJ DEP.  Work started 8/16/2018.

     

     

    The watershed also has some build in storm water basins (small lakes) west of Wickapecko.   Two Hollow brook and Terrence ponds have been dredged in the past but up stream water flows continue to erode the stream banks and further fill these critical retention ponds.  Most of Deal Lake’s problems are rooted in the lack of storm water controls in the watershed. Solutions will be discussed below.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    General Issues and Solutions:  The DLC continues to work with Town, Village, city, County and state officials on solving the following issues that are widespread and affect each of these governing bodies.  They are:

     

    1. Regional storm water management solutions that correct, replace and/or retrofit the existing storm water management infrastructure; (details in section summary)
    2. Stabilization of the lake’s tributary stream channels;
    3. Control of the influx of pollutants:  Education, identification, and enforcement.                          Call when you see issues:  CALL WARNDEP 1-877-WARNDEP 
    4. Control of floatables; Road improvements on state roads and local roads will install compliant storm water grates that will prevent floatables from reaching our lakes and water ways.    Current storm water regulations require local municipalities to clean all storm drain basins annually.  Regulations also require municipalities to upgrade drain heads with new ‘eco-design’ grates whenever a street is repaved or constructed.  We would like to:
    1. Seek state funding to speed up the installation of the prioritized drain basins by the towns, county and state DOT.
    2. Work with local municipalities to keep the new drain heads debris free and prevent street flooding from the grates becoming clogged.
    3. Continue to seek Section 319h funds for the installation of large MTD’s where applicable.
    4. Ensure towns do in fact install “eco-designed” grates during road construction.

     

    1. Reclamation of sediment-in-filled areas of the lake and development of a long-term management plan to ensure that the factors responsible for the infilling are corrected and that the reclaimed areas are easily and effectively maintained over time;
    2. Decrease in the occurrence of invasive species within the lake and within the riparian areas of the lake and its tributaries;
    3. Decrease in the frequency and magnitude of algae blooms; Improvement in the lake’s fishery as a major means of improving the lake’s overall use attainment; and decrease in fecal coliform loading. Continue Working with Monmouth University on sources of food for the Algae and work solutions to minimize this food source. 
    4. Increase enforcement of public and private leaf and debris dumping.
    5. Increase public awareness of how they can help Deal Lake with litter/debris removal and the ills of dumping.
    6. Improve a few towns recycling removal procedures so material does not make its way into the lake.  Some Towns can do better and help them do that. 
    7. Increase pressure on Local, State, and federal officials to fund projects to improve Deal Lake.

     

     

     

    MASTER PLAN Challenges – Important Issues

     

    Storm Water Management – The Deal Lake watershed is about 85% developed.  With every significant rain event most storm water is drained directly into the lake and its streams causing rapid rising of lake levels.  Less than 1% of the developed areas hold storm water in effective detention basins that allow for the slow release of the storm water let alone enabling recharge of the aquifers.  Our plan would:

    1. Identify locations on both public and private property where large regional storm water bio-detention basins could be constructed in the future.
    2. Permanently set aside this land for future basin use.
    3. Restore impacted the impacted riparian corridors and floodplains of the lake’s tributaries.  Doing so provides a natural means of collecting and storing storm water.  This not only reduces flooding, but it also decreases the erosive forces that continually down cut and erode the streams’ bed and banks (one of the major sources of sediment loading to the lake).
    4. Encourage the partnership of public officials and commercial property owners to construct regional storm water basins and re-pipe storm drains into them.
    5. Remove legal obstacles by having legislation created that would provide tax relief to private land owners who participated.

     

    MASTER PLAN HIGHLIGHTS – Genaral over view of Projects/Efforts

     

    Flooding – A major responsibility of the Commission is to minimize the risk of flooding from significant  rain events by coordinating the opening and closing the flume gates.  Projects that will help minimize this risk include the following:

    1. Electrification of the flume gate mechanisms and maintaining manual operation to ensure operation during times of power outage. .(ongoing project with the ACOE:  (Project completion 2020)
    2. The refurbishment of Mayer Dam located in Harvey Brook off Roseld Avenue at Wickapecko Avenue to create a large in-stream storm water retention basin.
    3. Create several regional storm water management basins in the vicinity of Sea view Square Mall and the Asbury Park (Rt 35/66) traffic circle and ensure the Coke Plant property is storm water friendly and meets and exceeds state requirements.
    4. Restore Terrace pond, Fireman’s Pond and Sunset Lake so they can be better retention ponds for the main lake.    
    5. Annually remind the towns and their planning boards of storm water management requirements.

     

     

    Removal of Organics, Debris, and Fallen Trees (Hydro-raking) – The Commission has budged for continued Hydro-raking of various lake sections as demonstrated by a  pilot project recently completed (2011-12) of the Lollipop regional storm water basin during.  Hydro-raking is not dredging as it does not involved the removal of accumulated silt.  However, it has some advantages relative to dredging:

    1. Currently does not require any DEP permits.
    2. Allows for the removal of all organics, debris, and even some fallen trees ( fallen trees do add structure for fish and wild life)
    3. The disposal of this debris and organics (though still difficult) is easier and less expensive then disposing of dredged sediments.
    4. In some areas of the lake 1 to 2 feet of depth can be restored by removing the accumulated debris.
    5. Work with towns on Joint efforts to removal organics in their unique section of the watershed. 

     

     

    Dredging – Every section of Deal Lake needs dredging.  Dredging is the part of the ultimate solution to restoring the lake and improving its water quality and ecological functionality.  Challenges related to dredging are the following:

    1. A safe, local dredge spoil disposal site does not exist.
    2. It is costly.  If the sediments are contaminant free it costs about $40 – $50 per cubic yard (approximately a ton of wet sediment) if a private contractor is used to dredge and dispose of sediment.  If the sediments contain elevated levels of contaminants the cost skyrockets to $85-$110 per cubic yard.  In fact costs of removal of sandy material in dec 2015 were about $138/Cu yard.
    3. Due to the developed nature of the watershed, most sections of Deal Lake lack sufficient adjacent de-watering sites.  This adds to the complexity of a dredging operation in that unless the sediments are sufficiently dewatered it costs dredging costs can escalate due to all of the added water weight.  Additionally, disposal sites may not accept sediments that are not at least partially dewatered and it may be a permit violation to truck the material unless it has at been partially dewatered.  Dewatering sites may have to found within the lake boarders.
    4. Volume of storm water entering the Western sections must be drastically reduced.  As noted above, bed and bank erosion of the tributaries is a  or silt will continue to migrate into Deal Lake requiring frequent maintenance dredging.
    5. Transporting dredged material requires special water tight vehicles to prevent spillage onto public roads.  Possible alternatives are tanker trucks and open top dry bulk trucks.
    6. Ideally the removal of accumulated silt will begin in the western portions of the lake and then proceed to the east and include the lake’s main body.  As part of the dredging efforts of the western arms and attempt will be made to increase their flood control, sediment containment and nutrient removal capabilities.  To increase the longevity of these projects it is imperative that future sediment loading be reduced.  This again will require more aggressive storm water management.

     

    Water Quality – Several less expensive projects can help with improving water quality. The Commission has been able to perform some projects like the MTDs and Tree box projects that will improve water quality.  More MTDs and  tree boxes and devices that can filter street run off are required.  The DLC will continued to request grants for improved water Quality.   Education on use of lawn fertilizer is critical.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Lake Bank Stabilization and Aesthetics – Most of Deal Lake’s 23 mile natural shoreline has become overgrown with invasive, non-native vegetation.  Some of the more pervasive weeds are knotweed, common reed, and purple loosestrife.  These plants overgrow the more desirable native species, and often compromise the stability of the lake’s shoreline and stream banks.  Both public and private shorelines have been neglected and now are overgrown with excessive trees, weeds and invasive plants.  The remaining shoreline in the Eastern main lake section along the Asbury Park, Loch Arbour and Interlaken shorelines have had bulkheads installed. Projects:

    1. Loch Arbour’s concrete bulkhead was replaced in 2000 & 2004 and the final section fully replaced in 2011.  Asbury Park’s sections of bulkhead continue to weaken and fall into the lake.  Replacing the remaining potions of Asbury Park’s aged bulkhead is a high priority.
    2. Invasive and non-native vegetation growth in and on the “ocean section” bulkhead is a problem and will require annual herbicide treatments and/or physical removal to control. 
    3. Educate lakeside property owners the correct techniques in shoreline restoration and bank stabilization.
    4. Establish a multi-year invasive weed eradication program including replacement with native species.
    5. Educate property owners on the construction of infiltration basins (“Rain Gardens”).
    6. Work with Garden and environmental commissions of the towns to Create infiltration basins (“Rain Gardens”) on public property where practical to capture nutrients and debris from run-off.
    7. Work with NJ Transit on maintenance of shoreline sections & bridges & bulk heads located within their right-of-way.
    8. Continue to support and expand the Carp contest with the Asbury fishing club and others to minimize the impact of the invasive Carp from Deal Lake and its tributaries.   

     

     

    Stream Bank Stabilization– Much of the silt that enters Deal Lake comes from the tremendous force of storm water eroding the stream channels as it makes its way to the lake.  When storm water retention basins come on line, the following projects can be started:

    1. Remove invasive species and replace with native plantings to better hold stream banks.
    2. Remove fallen trees and de-snag the debris that has been captured by them.

     

    Major Storm Debris Removal and Flume repairs:

    Storms may transport a tremendous amount of sand and debris into Deal Lake. Hurricane Sandy, in Oct 2012, resulted in Deal Lake being impacted by a variety of debris and tons of sand.  These impacts were greatest in the eastern section of the lake. The force of storms can also damage the flume building, the flume and all associated operating elements.   Due to the documented impacts caused by storms, after every major storm event the following actions should be implemented:

    1. Flume inspected and its operational status verified. This may require inspection by divers and should include an engineer’s evaluation.  
    2. Debris must be removed as soon as possible either by volunteers, municipal DPWs or private contractors as required.  FEMA funding has been requested.
    3. Bridges, culvert and other structures must be inspected for debris and sediment accumulation.

     

     

     

    Watershed Signage – Identify the Deal Lake Watershed boundaries. 

    1. Post signs to delineate the boundaries of the watershed along on Routes 18, 35, 66, and 71. Completed in 2014.
    2. Signs to educate the public about not feeding the wildlife.
    3. Signs for fishermen and boaters.
    4. Identify high litter areas and post signs.  Provide trash receptacles if it makes sense. Ask for help from local police departments to enforce littering fines.

     

    Educational Seminars and Materials – The Commission sponsored their first Storm Water Educational Forum for public works departments in September of 2009.  We plan to make this an annual event to help our seven local communities meet their required storm water management educational requirements.  We will also continue to make available educational materials to residents through the Deal Lake website, town websites and newsletters, and lake friends.  Important topics include:

    1. Proper use of fertilizers ( New laws has made this easier) Web link. 
    2. Keeping Eco-design drain heads clear
    3. Shoreline restoration
    4. Invasive aquatic plants & fish.
    5. Invasive shoreline plants and proper remediation techniques

     

    DETAILED PROJECT RECCOMMENDATIONS

     

    Mayer Dam at Harvey Brook:  Located near the intersection of Roseld Ave and Wickapecko Dr on Harvey Brook, is an old, but still relatively intact dam, referred to as the Mayer Dam in honor of Donald Mayer the first chairman of the DLC.  The project calls for the refurbished Mayer Dam to create a large in-stream regional storm water detention basin.   Cost:  $750k

     

    Regional Stormwater Basin for Seaview Mall:  The Commission is proposing a study to look into a joint public-private project to construct one or more regional storm water retention basins on Seaview Mall property.  It is very likely that the regional basins could be created by renovating the existing storm water basins presently located at the mall site along the lake’s Terrace Pond tributary.  These basins could hold large amounts of storm water generated not only by the mall, but by developed lands to the west of the mall, including portions of Route 18.  Cost of Study:  $25k.  Cost of Basin(s):  ~$400k

     

    Regional Stormwater Basins for Route 35, 66 & 18:  Presently there are no storm water retention basins with the ability to correctly control the rate, amount or quality of runoff generated from any of the State of NJ Highways that transverse the Deal Lake watershed.  The Commission is proposing a study to research the possibility of building several storm water basins on DOT land and also retrofit all storm drains with devices capable of better trapping sediment, road debris, litter and particulate pollutants that are currently flushed from these roads into the lake with no means of mitigation or reduction.   Cost of Study:  $25k.  Cost of Basins:  ~$800k

     

    Flume Gate Electrification/AutomationProject Approved & funded by Army Corp of Engineers in 2018:   Completion in 2020.  In order to respond quicker to significant rain events and prevent flooding, the open and closing mechanism of the flume gates will be now be opened remotely without the need to endangering operators.  .  During significant storm events when tidal surges occur, it becomes necessary to close the gates quickly to minimize ocean water infiltrating into the lake.   All parts of the flume house will be upgraded.  Cameras and weather station included.  The normal level of Deal Lake is only 3.2 feet above mean high tide.   Cost: ~$550,000

     

    Create Flood Level Flow Controls:  A simple and inexpensive redesign of the spillways at Hollow Brook, Terrace, and Lollipop Ponds could slow the rate that flood waters enter the main body of Deal Lake.  A simple notched weir could hold back 20 acre-feet of flood water.  Cost:  30k for design and implementation.

     

    Firemen’s Memorial Pond:  This small pond on Wickapecko Drive can barely be seen when driving by due to excessive tree and weed growth on its banks.  The Commission would like to restore Firemen’s Pond and make it a showcase for how to thin excessive tree and weed growth, beautify shoreline, stabilize banks, and restore lake vitality.  With citizen’s groups willing to adopt the pond after rehabilitation this effort should be given a high priority by Ocean Township.

     

    Lower Harvey Brook:  Remediate the eroded stream channel between Roseld and Monmouth Road.  A private land owner completed a large stream bank restoration and armor project that cost $100,000 in engineering, permits and construction.

     

    Dredge Harvey Brook Lake section:  After restoring Dam on Roseld, dredge the western section of Allenhurst section by Deal Golf course and create self-contained dewatering site and storage location for dege spoils on the north side of lake.  $1 million.

     

    Hollow Brook Basin:  Create a regional storm water basin south of Asbury Avenue behind Coca Cola plant.

     

    Establish Access to Basins Defined within Lake:  At each stream entry point, ensure access is available for maintenance dredging as needed.  Access points can also be used by emergency personal for quick rescue access and for recreation..

     

    Dredging:  When regional retention basins are on line and functioning, the final effort and most expensive solution is a complete dredging of the entire lake.  A large disposal site must be created by Monmouth County or the State of New Jersey.  Cost:  $50m

     

    Planning Board Oversight:  DLC needs to be in close contact with planning boards of our municipal’s to review plans and specifications submitted that could affect Deal Lake or its tributaries.  Some potential projects include;

    1. Neptune projects near Hollow Brook
    2. Expansion plans for Seaview Mall

     

     

    Dredging Sunset Lake:  Dredge sunset lake that feeds into Deal lake.   In addition, improve spillway to allow quick opening for storms and better storm water management downstream.  Trash and debris basin should also be installed.  Cost: TBD

     

    Dredging Terrece Pond & Lolli Pop Pond:  Dredge these two storm water retention ponds to create a healthier pond and provide better storm water management for the lower lake.   In addition, improve spillway to allow quick opening for storms and better storm water management downstream.  Trash and debris basin should also be installed.  $500,000

     

     

    Physical Parameter Chart for Deal Lake Master Plan

     

    TOPOGRAPHY,  MAP:  Deal Lake by the Section: 

    Due to a series of dams and geographically isolated sections in the main body, Deal Lake can be divided into twelve distinct ecosystems each with its own set of problems. There are also seven significant streams that feed into the lake.  Focusing on a section at a time will allow us to better fund maintenance and restoration projects and make these efforts more manageable.  Here are the sections and stream tributaries:

     

    Lake Sections and Ponds:

    1. Ocean section – East of Railroad Bridge to Ocean Avenue
    2. Main section – East of Wanamassa Point to Railroad Bridge
    3. Allenhurst section – West of Railroad Bridge to Monmouth Road
    4. Ironwell section – Just West of Allenhurst section and North of Interlaken
    5. Martin’s Branch – South of Interlaken and North of Wanamassa Point
    6. Sunset section – West of Wanamassa Point to Wickapecko Road
    7. Fireman’s Pond – Just West of Wickapecko Road between Grassmere and Raymere Avenues
    8. Lollipop Pond – West of Wickapecko Road and North of Foodtown Liquors
    9. Lollipop Retention Basin – West of Lollipop Pond
    10. Terrace Pond – West of Wickapecko Road and North of Colonial Terrace
    11. Hollow Pond – West of Wickapecko Road and South of Colonial Terrace
    12. Sunset Lake – (Yes it drains into Deal Lake) Sunset and it’s small water shed is part of Deal lake.  Between Sunset and 5th Avenues. 

     

    Significant Streams (From North to South):

    1. Harvey Brook (formerly Hog Swamp Brook) Headwaters at Kepwel Spring in Wayside
    2. Ironwell Creek (just south of Corlies ave and north of Interlaken park)
    3. Un-named Stream (feeds Fireman’s Pond)
    4. Un-named Stream (feeds Lollipop Pond)
    5. Un-named Stream (feeds Terrace Pond via English Manor)
    6. Un-named Stream (feeds Terrace Pond via Seaview Mall) (Headwaters un-named pond on Route 66.)
    7. Hollow Brook (Headwaters in West Bangs Avenue sand hills section in Neptune; runs south of ShopRite  and Shore Lanes bowling lanes)

    DEAL LAKE MAP:  The sections above are shown below:

     

     

     

    LAKE CHARACTERIZATION SPREADSHEET 

     

     

     

    DEAL LAKE MASTER PLAN  –  ALLENHURST SECTION

     

     

    WATER SURFACE AREA

     

     

    31.24 ACRES

     

    SHORELINE LENGTH

     

     

    12,050 FEET

     

    ADJACENT MUNICIPALITIES

     

     

    Township of Ocean, Borough of Deal, Borough of Allenhurst

     

    WATERSHED (ACRES)

     

     

    1573.09 ACRES

    (ref. watershed mapping)

     

    TRIBUTARIES

     

     

    Harvey Brook

     

    WATER DEPTH

     

     

    3.28 FEET (mean depth)

     

    EST. VOLUME OF SEDIMENT

     

     

    150,000 CUBIC YARDS (*)

     

    DRAINAGE OUTFALLS

     

    Ocean = 1

    Deal = 6

    Allenhurst = 11

     

                                                                                                                            (*) sediment volume based upon average depth of 3 feet

                                                                                                                            Ref. Infrastructure Mapping; DLC-05-02 (water depth)

     

     

     

    DEAL LAKE MASTER PLAN  – HOLLOW BROOK

     

     

    WATER SURFACE AREA

     

     

    1.74 ACRES

     

    SHORELINE LENGTH

     

     

    1,975 FEET

     

    ADJACENT MUNICIPALITIES

     

     

    Township of Ocean, Township of Neptune, City of Asbury Park

     

    WATERSHED (ACRES)

     

     

    641.66 ACRES

    (ref. watershed mapping – verify)

     

    TRIBUTARIES

     

     

    Hollow Brook

     

    WATER DEPTH

     

     

    2 + FEET (mean depth)

     

    EST. VOLUME OF SEDIMENT

     

     

    10,000 CUBIC YARDS (*)

     

    DRAINAGE OUTFALLS

     

     

    Ocean = (verify)

    Neptune = 5

     

    (*) sediment volume based upon average depth of 3 feet

                                                                                                                            Ref. Infrastructure Mapping

     

     

     

     

    DEAL LAKE MASTER PLAN  – LOLLIPOP POND

     

     

    WATER SURFACE AREA

     

     

    2.10 ACRES

     

    SHORELINE LENGTH

     

     

    2,200 FEET

     

    ADJACENT MUNICIPALITIES

     

     

    Township of Ocean

     

    WATERSHED (ACRES)

     

     

    204.14 ACRES

    (ref. watershed mapping)

     

    TRIBUTARIES

     

     

    Unnamed Tributary

     

    WATER DEPTH

     

     

    3 + FEET (mean depth)

     

    EST. VOLUME OF SEDIMENT

     

     

    10,000 CUBIC YARDS (*)

     

    DRAINAGE OUTFALLS

     

     

    Ocean = 2

     

                                                                                                                            (*) sediment volume based upon average depth of 3 feet

                                                                                                                            Ref. Infrastructure Mapping

     

     

     

     

    DEAL LAKE MASTER PLAN  – LOLLIPOP RETENTION BASIN

     

     

    WATER SURFACE AREA

     

     

    0.11 ACRES

     

    SHORELINE LENGTH

     

     

    275 FEET

     

    ADJACENT MUNICIPALITIES

     

     

    Township of Ocean

     

    WATERSHED (ACRES)

     

     

    Include in Lollipop Pond

     

     

    TRIBUTARIES

     

     

    Unnamed Tributary

     

    WATER DEPTH

     

     

    0 + FEET (mean depth)

     

    EST. VOLUME OF SEDIMENT

     

     

    1,000 CUBIC YARDS (*)

     

    DRAINAGE OUTFALLS

     

     

    Ocean = 2

     

                                                                                                                            (*) sediment volume based upon average depth of 5 feet

                                                                                                                            Ref. Infrastructure Mapping

     

     

     

     

    DEAL LAKE MASTER PLAN  –  MARTIN’S BRANCH

     

     

    WATER SURFACE AREA

     

     

    13.9 ACRES

     

    SHORELINE LENGTH

     

     

    8,350 FEET

     

    ADJACENT MUNICIPALITIES

     

     

    Township of Ocean, Borough of Interlaken

     

    WATERSHED (ACRES)

     

     

    314.55 ACRES

    (ref. watershed mapping)

     

    TRIBUTARIES

     

     

    Lollipop Pond; Fireman’s Pond

     

    WATER DEPTH

     

     

    2-3 + FEET (mean depth)

     

    EST. VOLUME OF SEDIMENT

     

     

    65,000 CUBIC YARDS (*)

     

    DRAINAGE OUTFALLS

     

     

    Ocean = 5

    Interlaken = 5

     

                                                                                                                            (*) sediment volume based upon average depth of 3 feet

                                                                                                                            Ref. Infrastructure Mapping; DLC-05-02 (water depth)

     

     

     

     

    DEAL LAKE MASTER PLAN  – SUNSET LAKE

     

     

    WATER SURFACE AREA

     

     

    12.75 ACRES

     

    SHORELINE LENGTH

     

     

    4,675 FEET

     

    ADJACENT MUNICIPALITIES

     

     

     City of Asbury Park

     

    WATERSHED (ACRES)

     

     

    143.76 ACRES

    (ref. watershed mapping)

     

    TRIBUTARIES

     

     

    Surface Runoff

     

    WATER DEPTH

     

     

    2-3 + FEET (mean depth)

     

    EST. VOLUME OF SEDIMENT

     

     

    50,000 CUBIC YARDS (*)

     

    DRAINAGE OUTFALLS

     

     

    Asbury Park = 18

     

    (*) sediment volume based upon average depth of 3 feet

                                                                                                                            Ref. Infrastructure Mapping

     

     

     

     

    DEAL LAKE MASTER PLAN  – SUNSET SECTION

     

     

    WATER SURFACE AREA

     

     

    13.86 ACRES

     

    SHORELINE LENGTH

     

     

    9,000 FEET

     

    ADJACENT MUNICIPALITIES

     

     

    Township of Ocean, Township of Neptune, City of Asbury Park

     

    WATERSHED (ACRES)

     

     

    206.88 ACRES

    (ref. watershed mapping – verify)

     

    TRIBUTARIES

     

     

    Harvey Brook; Terrace Pond

     

    WATER DEPTH

     

     

    4.92 FEET (mean depth)

     

    EST. VOLUME OF SEDIMENT

     

     

    60,000 CUBIC YARDS (*)

     

    DRAINAGE OUTFALLS

     

     

    Ocean = 5

    Asbury Park = 11

     

                                                                                                                            (*) sediment volume based upon average depth of 3 feet

                                                                                                                            Ref. Infrastructure Mapping; DLC-05-02 (water depth)

     

     

     

     

    DEAL LAKE MASTER PLAN  – TERRACE POND

     

     

    WATER SURFACE AREA

     

     

    7.22 ACRES

     

    SHORELINE LENGTH

     

     

    5,050 FEET

     

    ADJACENT MUNICIPALITIES

     

     

    Township of Ocean

     

    WATERSHED (ACRES)

     

     

    697.25 ACRES

    (ref. watershed mapping)

     

    TRIBUTARIES

     

     

    Cedar Village; Unnamed Tributary

     

    WATER DEPTH

     

     

    5 + FEET (mean depth)

     

    EST. VOLUME OF SEDIMENT

     

     

    5,000 CUBIC YARDS (*)

     

    DRAINAGE OUTFALLS

     

     

    Ocean = 2

     

    (*) sediment volume based upon average depth of 3 feet, 42,000 cubic yards of material removed in 2002-2003

                                                                                                                            Ref. Infrastructure Mapping

     

     

     

    DEAL LAKE MASTER PLAN  –  OCEAN SECTION

     

     

    WATER SURFACE AREA

     

     

    47.2 ACRES

     

    SHORELINE LENGTH

     

     

    9,175 FEET

     

    ADJACENT MUNICIPALITIES

     

     

    Village of Loch Arbour, City of Asbury Park, Borough of Interlaken

     

    WATERSHED (ACRES)

     

     

    172.22 ACRES

    (ref. watershed mapping)

     

    TRIBUTARIES

     

     

    Main Section, Allenhurst Section

     

    WATER DEPTH

     

     

    3.28 FEET (mean

    depth)

     

    EST. VOLUME OF SEDIMENT

     

     

    250,000 CUBIC YARDS (*)

     

    DRAINAGE OUTFALLS

     

     

    Loch Arbour = 22

    Asbury Park = 23

     

                                                                                                                            (*) sediment volume based upon average depth of 3 feet

                                                                                                                            Ref. Infrastructure Mapping; DLC-05-02 (water depth)

     

     

     

     

    DEAL LAKE MASTER PLAN  –  IRONWELL SECTION

     

     

    WATER SURFACE AREA

     

     

    7.31 ACRES

     

    SHORELINE LENGTH

     

     

    5,200 FEET

     

    ADJACENT MUNICIPALITIES

     

     

    Township of Ocean, Borough of Interlaken

     

    WATERSHED (ACRES)

     

     

    237.69 ACRES

    (ref. watershed mapping)

     

    TRIBUTARIES

     

     

    Unnamed Tributary

     

    WATER DEPTH

     

     

    2-3 + FEET (mean depth)

     

    EST. VOLUME OF SEDIMENT

     

     

    35,000 CUBIC YARDS (*)

     

    DRAINAGE OUTFALLS

     

     

    Ocean = 12

    Interlaken = 1

     

                                                                                                                            (*) sediment volume based upon average depth of 3 feet

                                                                                                                            Ref. Infrastructure Mapping; DLC-05-02 (water depth)

     

     

     

     

    DEAL LAKE MASTER PLAN  –  MAIN SECTION

     

     

    WATER SURFACE AREA

     

     

    18.5 ACRES

     

    SHORELINE LENGTH

     

     

    5,950 FEET

     

    ADJACENT MUNICIPALITIES

     

     

    Township of Ocean, City of Asbury Park, Borough of Interlaken

     

    WATERSHED (ACRES)

     

     

    358.68 ACRES

    (ref. watershed mapping)

     

    TRIBUTARIES

     

     

    Martin’s Branch, Sunset Section

     

    WATER DEPTH

     

     

    5.61 FEET (mean depth)

     

    EST. VOLUME OF SEDIMENT

     

     

    90,000 CUBIC YARDS (*)

     

    DRAINAGE OUTFALLS

     

     

    Interlaken = 6

    Asbury Park = 4

     

                                                                                                                            (*) sediment volume based upon average depth of 3 feet

                                                                                                                            Ref. Infrastructure Mapping; DLC-05-02 (water depth)

     

     

     

     

    DEAL LAKE MASTER PLAN  – FIREMAN’S POND

     

     

    WATER SURFACE AREA

     

     

    1.00 ACRES

     

    SHORELINE LENGTH

     

     

    1,000 FEET

     

    ADJACENT MUNICIPALITIES

     

     

    Township of Ocean

     

    WATERSHED (ACRES)

     

     

    Included in Martin’s Branch

     

    TRIBUTARIES

     

     

    Overland Flow

     

    WATER DEPTH

     

     

    2 + FEET (mean depth)

     

    EST. VOLUME OF SEDIMENT

     

     

    5,000 CUBIC YARDS (*)

     

    DRAINAGE OUTFALLS

     

     

    Ocean = 7

     

     

     

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